The Real Facts About Blue Cheese

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by Powerhouse Museum Collection

Blue cheese, also known as Bleu cheese is one of the most famous types of cheeses all over the world. Some of the reasons for the popularity of Blue cheese include the rich flavor that it comes with as well as its versatility as it has been used in different types of Blue cheese recipes; however, in spite of the popularity of this bold mold cheese, few know all the fun facts about Blue cheese. Let’s look at some of the background here.

History of Blue Cheese:

It is believed that Blue cheese was discovered by accident. Since the caves in which the blue cheeses were aged were damp and hot, it encouraged the development of various types of molds. The molds, in combination with other ingredients in the cheese led to a different flavor. One of the people decided to have a taste of the blue cheese, when the others have though that they were spoiled, and the exquisite taste was discovered. This resulted to different types of blue cheeses, some old and some new.

Different Blue Cheese Types:

Roquefort Blue Cheese

This was believed to be discovered in AD 79 and was made from Ewe’s milk. It is a treasured French mold cheese and comes with a unique aging process. It is stored in the caves near caves of Roquefort-sur-Soulzon. It is recommended to be used with figs, nuts and wines.

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Gorgonzola Cheese

This type of Blue cheese was named after the village in Italy in which it was invented. This Italian cheese has a history dating back to the 11th Century and is available in two versions: Gorgonzola Picante, which is aged for one year and comes with a sharp taste and crumbly texture and Gorgonzola Dolce which is aged for 3-5 months and features a sweet flavor and a cram texture. Picante and dolce mean spicy and sweet in the Italian language, respectively. For those who like cheese and wine, Gorgonzola Blue cheese is one of the best Port wine cheese pairings.

Stilton Blue Cheese

This cheese type originated from England in the 18th century and is now produced in areas such as Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire and Leicestershire. Produced from local pasteurized milk, Stilton is aged for nine weeks and then pressed into cylindrical molds. It comes with a crumbly texture and an acidic taste that makes Stilton Blue cheese a great choice for salads and entrees.

Cabrales Blue Cheese

Made in northern Spain, Cabrales is made in the artisan tradition. It is made from pure and unpasteurized cow’s milk and can also be made from cow’s milk that is blended with goat or sheep milk in a traditional manner. The production of this type involves the heating of the milk and curdling by the inclusion of rennet. It is known for its strong flavor that can be quite acidic. The extremely bold nature of this artisan mold cheese makes it particularly stand out.

Danablu

This type of blue cheese was invented in the 20th Century in Denmark. This Danish Blue Cheese is aged for five to six weeks until the aged cheese has indicated the blue-green marbling. It comes with a sharp taste and a creamy flavor which makes it suitable for dark breads, fruits and red wines.

 

These cheese types can be used in different types of blue cheese recipes. Some of the foods that can be prepared with them include burgers, salads, steaks and vegetables. It is also important that the users check out the freshness and taste before they buy Blue cheese. We recommend visiting Rosenborg online for more on Blue cheese varieties, recipes, and a Blue cheese taste scale!

The “True Bleu” Experience has been brought to you by Rosenborg, Makers of Fine Blue Cheese since 1926.


Article from articlesbase.com

Music Video to the song Blue by a perfect circle from the Thirteenth Step album.
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