Guitar lesson Newmarket Do you know all five positions of the Blues scale?

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by Swedish National Heritage Board

If you’re a blues guitarist getting started or an advanced blues player, every one knows there first lesson on how to play a rock or blues minor pentatonic scale in the first position.  When you first learn this scales it sure is a lot of fun, but everyone always will want to intuitively learn how to play it moving up the fret board and sounding the higher notes.

The notes in the minor pentatonic scale in the key of G are.  G, Bb. C, D, F G.

The major scale is. G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G.  The notes you use from the major scale to make a G minor pentatonic scale are the G note (root), Bb note (b3), C note, (perfect 4th), D note (perfect 5th), F note (b7), and back to the G note (root).

The only little challenge the beginner blues players have is to understand is the major 7th degree of the G major scale is the F# note.  To use the G major scale in a blues manner the F# note has to be flattened to an F natural note (F minor 7th degree).

The other point I want to make is the B note (major 3rd) in the G major scale has to be flattened to make a Bb note.  This is widely common knowledge for all blues players and; it is known and coined by a phrase “THE BLUE NOTE”.  The blue note in this example is simply the major 3rd degree of the G scale (B note), and it has to be flattened to Bb.

One more thing to point out before we get started with some cool blues ideas.  The notes you remove from a G major scale to make a G minor pentatonic scale are the A note (2nd degree), and the E note (6th degree),

In the key of G, the pentatonic minor scale is perfect for playing blues.  I want to introduce to you an extra note you can apply to the G minor pentatonic scale.  It is called the flat five note.  It is very simple for you to find the flat five of the G minor pentatonic scale.  The 5th note up from the root note G is the D note (a perfect 5th).  All that you have to do is approach the D note with a D flat note, which is one fret from behind the target D note.  This scale is now called the blues scale.

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Now play this up only one octave and you will see how easy it is.  The next major essential task is to then continue playing up wards to the second octave of the G blues scale. The fingering gets a little harder when playing up to the second octave on the higher strings because of the way the guitar is tuned.

 

Do you know all five positions of the Blues scale?  I hear the answer yes. Great!

I will name the notes of the G blues scale. G note (root), Bb note (minor3rd), C note (perfect 4th), Db note (flat 5th), D note (perfect 5th), F note (minor 7th), and G note (root).

If this is confusing, always remember you are deriving the blues scale from the G major scale.  The G major scale has the major 7th degree which is an F# note, and it has a major 3rd note which is the B note.  Both the B note, the F# note and, the Db note have to be flattened to make a G minor pentatonic scale.

The wood shedding you have to do is play this new G minor blues pentatonic scale in all positions.

To get you going lets play G minor blues pentatonic scale starting on the root G.

1. The first position of the G minor blues pentatonic scale notes are G, Bb, C, Db, D natural,  F natural, G.

2. The second position of the G minor blues pentatonic scale notes are Bb, C, Db, D natural, F natural, G.

You are playing these scales starting on the low 6th string, and only going up one octave. Be able to play that perfect first and then move up the frets to reach the next octave hitting the G note.  This will take some work because of how the guitar is tuned.

Ok the rest is up to you.  You can find the minor pentatonic guitar scales in tabs in one of your books.  All you have to do to all five positions of this scale is flattening the 5th Degree. In the beginning it will sound like just scales going up the fret board and back down.  It is not really making blues music.

Guitar lesson Newmareket.  My name is Rick Washbrook.  I want you to understand the blues scales.  I have a few tips for you when learning these fingerings for all five positions on the fret board.  These fingering with the b5 in the minor pentatonic scale are harder to learn than your simple pentatonic scale.  There is more finger stretching to do when playing these blues scales.

 

http://www.washbrookmusic.com

 

Guitar lesson Newmarket Do you know all five positions of the Blues scale?

Hello, I am Rick Washbrook Guitarist.  I want to share with you how to play the blues scale in all five positions.  I strongly suggest learning them on two string groups at a time playing a simple traditional blues licks.

 

 

I have a blues guitar video that can help you.  “The complete approach to learning blues scales by applying tradition blues licks”.  I show you a lot of traditional licks from my own experience of listening and playing the blues guitar for 38 years.  It is so important to have the vocabulary of the traditional licks to really learn your blues scales and develop your blues guitar style.

 

Here Is a Tip.

Learn all blues scales positions on two strings at a time, and dig down deep into your blues soul and play those traditional blues licks you hear.  Play them on two strings at a time.  If you do this you will really cover all the positions with a more musical learning approach.   By the time you make simple traditional blues licks for two sting groups. You will have all five positions of the G blues scales, and you will be playing with blues inflections and soul.

The two string groups are 1st and 2nd string, 2nd and 3rd string, 3rd and 4th string, 4th and 5th string, 5th string and 6th string.

 

Here are a two of washbrooks articles.

Guitar Lesson Newmarket Classical By: Rick Washbrook

http://gpartoicles.com/article/Guitar-Lesson-Newmarket-Clasical-Guitar/5019728/

 

Moonlit Solace By Rick Washbrook

Written by  Suzi Price

 

http://www.jazzreview.com/reviews/latest-cd-track-reviews/item/26569.html

 

 

Guitar lesson Newmarket Do you know all five positions of the Blues scale?

 


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